Example of Employee Goals

by on November 20, 2009

If you’re a new manager or maybe a manger who has been managing for a while, you realize how difficult it is to keep the day-to-day operations of a business going and the challenge of constantly striving to take the organization to the next level.

Not every manager knows how to write goals, but goals are an important part of the performance management process and are used to achieve corporate objectives. Organizational business goals are a 50,000 foot look at the organization, but the day-to-day management of staff requires managers to give each employee very specific goals to accomplish to do their part in helping move the organization forward.

Employee specific goals can help do that. To give you a visual of how this works, let’s look at the following and start at the top of the organization:

Goals should start with the vision of the organization. The vision drives the strategic plan. The strategic plan lays out goals for the organization by year for a multiyear period of time. Each department of the organization should then have goals that support the organizational goals. And lastly, employee goals should support departmental goals. Okay, here’s an example of work goals.

Organizational Goal: Improve Employee Satisfaction by 10 pts

Departmental Goal (Human Resources): Improve employee satisfaction by 10 pts

Example Human Resources Employee Goals

Employee Name:   Betty Smith
Employee Goal:  Evaluate Employee Satisfaction, Develop and Implement Improvement Plan


Tips for employee goals:

  • Goals should be written in the 4th quarter for the following year and should support the organizational goals for the next year.
  • Goals should be written WITH the employee to ensure the employee buys in on the goals and they have a good understanding of expectations.
  • Goals should be reviewed with managers on at least a quarterly basis to ensure that progress toward completion of goals is done.
  • Goals should be included in the written performance appraisal and should carry some weight in the measurement of success of an employee (note: some goals will have greater importance than others).
  • Employees should be praised and acknowledged on a job well done when goals are completed.
  • Compensation systems should be structured to reward employees who complete annual goals with merit increases.

Lastly, set expectations for employees and give them the tools/resources they need to do their job.  Reward them when they do a good job/correct them when they don’t and you’ll have successful and engaged employees!

If you would like a copy of the goal document click here.

If you are interested in learning more about managing employee performance, check out our new on-line Employee Performance Management class.  For only $97, this is an inexpensive way to train you or your managers and we offer a money back guarantee so you have nothing to lose.  Use coupon code smart20 to get 20% off.  Click here to learn more!  

photo by:  Argone National Laboratory

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