Administrative Assistant Performance Goals Examples

by on January 8, 2014

Administrative assistants are of the most valuable of all employees because they are the doers, the ones who get things done and can be instrumental in helping the organization achieve its objectives.

This of course is if they have a good understanding of what is expected of them and written employee goals to help them prioritize daily work tasks.

Someone recently asked me to provide some examples of administrative assistant performance goals.   My first question to them is what kind of goals does his/her manager have and how can the admin help their manager achieve departmental goals?

I am a firm believer that the only way for any organization to achieve its mission and corporate objectives is to articulate and write business goals and to monitor their completion through a structured performance management process.

Writing administrative assistant SMART goals requires determining the necessary action steps, as well as, identifying a person who has responsibility for completing them.

For example, let’s say the admin works for the manager over the purchasing department and the manager has a goal to reduce supply costs.

The manager could solicit help from her administrative assistant to do the research and audit departmental spending. So it might look like this:

Purchasing Department Goal: Reduce purchasing supply costs by 10%.

The purchasing department spends an average of $1000 per month on supplies and they need to cut out $100 (10% of $1000) per month in costs.

Sample Administrative Assistant Goal: Reduce purchasing supply costs by 10%.

What this might look like in a goal document:


Example #2

The administrative assistant works for the manager of human resources.

Human Resources Goal: Maintain 100% I-9 Form compliance.

There are 75 active employee files and the admin needs to make sure each of those files has a completed I-9 form.

Example HR Administrative Assistant Goal: Ensure 100% of HR files have completed I-9 forms.

This goal document might look like this:


Employee goals are important because they support the goals of individual departments which should line up with the implementation of business strategy.

The beauty of flowing goal responsibility throughout the organization is that it gives every employee an opportunity to participate in the process. This responsibility helps employees understand how what they do on a day-to-day basis affects the ability of the organization to achieve corporate objectives.

Employees who are given clear goals, and understand what is expected of them, are better prepared to perform at desired levels.

Consistent communication with employees is the best way to keep employees engaged.

Administrative assistants, in particular, are vital to an organization’s success.  It is a good use of time to write goals for them and use them to help the organization achieve business strategy.

Do your administrative assistants have goals?

If you are interested in learning more about managing employee performance, check out our new on-line Employee Performance Management class.  For $97,this is an inexpensive way to train you or your managers and we offer a money back guarantee so you have nothing to lose.  Use coupon code smart20 to get 20% off.  Click here to learn more!  

photo by:  ILRI

This article was originally published August, 2012, updated January, 2014.

{ 2 comments… read them below or add one }

Kate Pedlar February 7, 2014 at 12:55 pm

This was helpful but to a point because it doesn’t fit my reality unfortunately. I am an Executive Administrative Assistant, I support a Vice President. He’s the first manager I’ve worked with who is serious about my performance plan and wants me stay on track and formalize it so we can work toward performance goals. I really am grateful for the opportunity; a performance plan is like a steering mechanism and without one we try to stay on course but it is difficult. However, I feel strongly, based on my experience, performance plans for Admin Asst’s are subjective, very subjective. There is no science behind scoring them. In my organization, some get 4 out of 4 consistently and no performance plan is set up at the beginning of the year; others may set one up and get 3 but if you measure the other 4/4 person against it, they would really deserve a 2. Each manager has a different ‘method’ or approach to scoring their administrative assistant. I have a friend who’s an assistant; she got a ’0′. Impossible; if she were really worth a zero, they would have fired her. Also, her manager never worked on a development plan with her as a measure to ‘improve’ her performance. Her manager kept record of every little, minor ‘error’ my friend did. This is like a bad parent punishing and admonishing their child without teaching them how to improve and learn to behave according to social norms. The ’0′ rating for my friend seriously effected her self esteem on the job. I see performance plans come through my desk of direct reports who are in professional roles. They have goals that are easier to define and measure. Like your article, they can list a deliveralbe for the year i.e. Complete so and so project on time and on budget by November 2014, or; Develop an plan and execute by such and such a time to engage staff in apply new behaviour paradigm and measure it with a goal of reaching 60% engaged by end of year. What can I submit?: I do this, do this, do this, do this, do it by, do it by, do it by, do it by. Oh, and then, I do many other things that come down the pipline that aren’t on my list but can’t forecast. How are you going to measure that? My VP keeps his cards close to his chest; I’ve asked but he won’t give me rights to his emails; I don’t know what projects he is working on unless I am tasked to do something. We meet weekly so I can bring forward items I am working on but he doesn’t tell me what he’s working on and how I can assist. I am in a more traditional support role. So, your suggestion to align my goals to the department’s goals doesn’t matchup for me. We are coming closer to an idea for measurement and scoring my performance at the end of the year, which is tied to our company scorecard and my bonus. He’s thinking of scoring me on the number of ‘errors’ I make. And, he’s asked me to put some thought into it to, which is great because he wants my feedback. I get where he is coming from; accuracy and timeliness are basically the two main keys to focus on when in an admin role. However, errors happen, we’re all human. If we proceed with his model for scoring, I will ask it be changed to ‘accuracy’. But, what can be perceived as an error is subjective. I work closeley with an assistant who is in a more senior support role. She was criticized for a minor ‘error’; it was leaving FWD in the subject header of an email cascaded down through her division. My point is that as administrative assistants, we are judged not by how many other things we qualititativly execute behind the scenes to help our execs job run smoothly and maintain the positive image. How do we measure our delivery and completion of tasks, assignments and deliverables (whatever noun you can come up with) to be objective? What other things can be measure quantitatively against an admin assistant’s performance. Are there any other resources out there that I can use to assist in coming up with a plan and an objective scoring method?

Reply

Patricia Lotich February 12, 2014 at 3:06 pm

Hi Kate! Thanks for the comment. It seems like you have a complex situation. I suggest you solicit help from your HR person and see if he/she can help you work toward a goal document that supports what your VP is trying to do while helping you understand what is expected of you and how it will be measured.

I hope this helps!

Patricia

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